Cherry blossoms from Japan have arrived in Cincinnati

NEW ON WLWT. IT MAY NOT FEEL LIKE THIS MORNING. IT” BRINGING JUST AROUND THE CORNER ONE OF THE SURE SIGNS OF SPRINGTIME AND WARMER WEATHER IN CINCINNATI IS THE BUTTERFLY SHOW. YES AND WLWT NEWS SAYS KATIE DONOVAN LIVE THIS MORNING AT THE CHROME CONSERVATORY WITH A LOOK AT THIS CINCINNATI’S FAVORITE KATIE. IT’S FUN TO GO BACK YEAR AFTER YEAR. OH, YEAH, ABSOLUTELY GUYS. I LOOK FORWARD TO IT EVERY YEAR, EVEN COVERING THIS STORY. I WAS SO EXCITED BEFORE I WENT INSIDE AND SEE THE BUTTERFLY. SO THIS IS JUST A REALLY NEAT EXPERIENCE. YOU KNOW WHAT IT DOESN’T FEEL AT ALL. SPRING IS JUST VERY VERY COLD. IF YOU ARE TIRED OF THE WINTER WEATHER, YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A WAY TO SMILE. THERE IS NO BETTER WAY THAN TO SURROUND YOURSELF IN BUTTERFLIES AND YOU CAN DO IT HERE AT THE CHROME CONSERVATORY EVERY SPRING THOUSANDS OF FREE FLYGIN BUTTERFLIES FLUTTER ANGMO VISITORS TO THE CHROME CONSERVATORY WHEN YOU WALK THROUGH THE CROW GATES AND YOU GO BEET M WITH LUSH PLANTS AND A DISPLAY OF ABOUT 1,000 A COLORFUL BUTTERFLIES THIS YEAR. THIS YEAR’S THEME IS BUTTERFLIES OF THE NEIL WHICH DRAWN INSPIRATION FROM ANCIENT EGYPTIAN PAINTINGS OF GARNSDE AND WATER FEATURES. CROWN PERMITTED FOR 00 1 EXOTIC FLY SPECIES AND ON ANY GIVEN DAY. THERE ARE USUALLY ABOUT 1,000 OF THEM FLYING AROUND THE ROOM AT A TIME DIRECTOR MARK HOWE SHARED TO ME HOW ALL THESE BUTTERFLIES ARE INSIDE. BUTTERFLIES ARE FARMED BY FARMERS ALL OVER THE WORLD AND THEY RUN ON CHRYSALIDS BUTTERFLY FARMERS COLLECT THEM. PUT THEM IN A BOX OVERNIGHT FOR US ALREADY EVERY TUESDAY AND FRIDAY TO RECEIVE THESE PACKAGES USUALLY FROM FEDEX OR UPS. AND WE TAKE OUT THE LSID CRYSTAL AND PUT THEM IN CONTAINERS AND THE BUTTERFLIES EMERGE. AND ONCE THEIR WINGS ARE DRY AND THEY ARE ABLE TO FLY. WE PUT THEM IN A SMALL TAXI. AND WE BRING THEM INTO THE ROOM AND RELEASE THEM AROUND 11 AM EVERY DAY. THIS IS A VERY GOOD PROCESS. SO WHEN YOU GO TO THE SHOW, YOU WILL BE OFFERED A BUTTERFLY CATCHER. IT IS A SCENTED BLUE CARD THAT HELPS TO ATTRACT. BUTTERFLY STEER HAND HOUSE SAYS IT’S BEST TO BUY YOUR TICKETS Y ONLINE BECSEAU IT GUARANTEES YOU A PLACE INSIDE TICKETS AT THE DOOR ARE OFFERED ON A FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIS NOW THE BUTT ERFLY SHOW IS ON UNTIL JUNE 19TH THIS YEAR IF YOU WANT TO GET INSIDE ADULT $10 TICKETS FOR CHILDREN 5-17 YEARS OF AGE THAT WILL BE $7 AND CHILDREN 4 AND UNDER WILL BE FREE FOR THIS EVENT EVERY TICKET YOU GIVE ONE HOUR ADMISSION WITH LIVE BUTTERFLIES

Cherry blossoms donated by Japan have arrived in Cincinnati

The Cincinnati Park Board received cherry blossoms sent by the city of Adachi, Japan, to the 2010 Butterflies of Japan exhibit at the Krohn Conservatory this week.

The Cincinnati Park Board received cherry blossoms sent by the city of Adachi, Japan, during the 2010 Japan Butterfly Show at the Krohn Conservatory this week. The newly arrived cherry blossom trees continue to celebrate and honor the enduring friendship between the people of the United States in the United States and Japan. This cherry blossom tree gift continues a strong and special tradition of trees donation to the United States from Japan. In the 1930s, Cincinnati’s Ault Park received 1,000 cherry blossom trees from Japan. In 2008, the Japan America Society planted another 151 Somei Yoshino cherry trees in the Ault Park grove. Each year in Washington, DC, the National Cherry Blossom Festival commemorates the 1912 gift of 3,000 cherry trees from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo to the city of Washington, DC. Mayor Kondo of Adachi said, “We would like to thank everyone who worked on the quarantine process and the lifting of the graft branches we sent for so long, especially in the difficult situation of the corona pandemic. We hope these cherry trees will bloom many flowers and help Cincinnatians get a glimpse of the Japanese spring. Cincinnati Mayor Aftab Pureval added, “We are extremely grateful to the Mayor of Kondo and the people of Adachi for their generosity of donation and this whole gesture represents for the current and future goodwill between our cities. We will do everything in our power to care for and honor these special trees. “My great-grandfather, Dr. Manabu Miyoshi, was a botanist at the University of Tokyo and he discovered many varieties of cherry blossoms (Sakura). My personal connection through Japan and my great-grandfather father make me very excited about this great gift. I hope to see everyone enjoying these new Sakura trees in the Cincinnati parks very soon,” said Tokiko Ando Freeman. Why did it take 12 years? The United States Department of Agriculture controls the entry of agricultural products into the United States, the 10 gifted trees sent from Japan in 2010 had to be placed in quarantine until they could be tested free of the virus. Each spring the trees were tested and whenever they found a virus the quarantine center staff decided to help by taking tissue culture pieces of each variety and treating them to prevent the virus. They then created a virus-free tree us of each variety by grafting the tissue culture seedlings onto a cherry blossom root stem. After many years of tedious work, two of the cherry blossoms have finally arrived and are on display at the Krohn Conservatory. The trees will be planted in the Eden Park area and will be joined by the rest of the trees once they are released from quarantine. “While preparing for the 2010 Butterflies of Japan event at Krohn, I had the good fortune to meet many amazing partners in Japan who provided unique butterflies for the exhibit, insects such as song crickets and giant beetles, cultural exhibits, and those incredible cherry trees. Our partners in Japan have shared so many of their traditions and insights to infuse the show with cultural precision,” said Andrea Schepmann, former executive director of the Krohn Conservatory. following have helped make this donation possible, despite many challenges and for many years: Yayoi Kondo, Mayor of Adachi City Tokyo, Japan Takako Asaka, President, Sakura Association Taro Enomoto, Former General Manager of the City of Adachi Living ThingsKenji Usukura, City of Adachi, Cherry Blossom SpecialistTokiko Ando Freeman, Toyota Motors North AmericaAndrea Schepmann, Former Managing Director, Krohn ConservatoryGerald Checco, Former Park Board Superintendent Jan Brown Checco, Artistic Director, Butterflies of Japan Bob Taft, Former Governor of Ohio Carla Romannelli, Former Director Director, JASGC

The Cincinnati Park Board received cherry blossoms sent by the city of Adachi, Japan, to the 2010 Butterflies of Japan exhibit at the Krohn Conservatory this week.

The newly arrived cherry blossoms continue to celebrate and honor the enduring friendship between the peoples of the United States and Japan.

This Cherry Blossom Tree Donation continues a strong and special tradition of donating trees to the United States from Japan. In the 1930s, Cincinnati’s Ault Park received 1,000 cherry blossom trees from Japan. In 2008, the Japan America Society planted another 151 Somei Yoshino cherry trees in the Ault Park grove. Each year in Washington, DC, the National Cherry Blossom Festival commemorates the 1912 gift of 3,000 cherry trees from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo to the city of Washington, DC.

Mayor Kondo of Adachi said, “We would like to thank everyone who worked on the quarantine process and the lifting of the graft branches we sent for so long, especially in the difficult situation of the corona pandemic. We hope these cherry trees will bloom many flowers and help Cincinnatians get a glimpse of the Japanese spring.

Cincinnati Mayor Aftab Pureval added, “We are extremely grateful to the Mayor of Kondo and the people of Adachi for their generosity of donation and this whole gesture represents for the current and future goodwill between our cities. We will do everything in our power to care for and honor these special trees. »

“My great-grandfather, Dr. Manabu Miyoshi, was a botanist at the University of Tokyo and he discovered many varieties of cherry blossoms (Sakura). My personal connection through Japan and my great-grandfather make me very excited about this great gift. I hope to see everyone enjoying these new Sakura trees in Cincinnati parks very soon,” said Tokiko Ando Freeman.

Why did it take 12 years?

The United States Department of Agriculture controls the entry of agricultural products into the United States, the 10 gifted trees sent from Japan in 2010 had to be placed in quarantine until they could be tested free of the virus.

Each spring the trees were tested and whenever they found a virus the quarantine center staff decided to help by taking tissue culture pieces of each variety and treating them to prevent the virus. They then created a virus-free tree of each variety by grafting the tissue culture seedlings onto a stem of cherry blossom root.

After many years of tedious work, two of the cherry blossoms have finally arrived and are on display at the Krohn Conservatory. The trees will be planted in the Eden Park area and will be joined by the rest of the trees once they are released from quarantine.

“While preparing for the 2010 Butterflies of Japan event at Krohn, I had the good fortune to meet many amazing partners in Japan who provided unique butterflies for the exhibit, insects such as song crickets and giant beetles, cultural exhibits, and those incredible cherry trees. Our partners in Japan have shared so many of their traditions and insights to infuse the show with cultural precision,” said Andrea Schepmann, former executive director of the Krohn Conservatory.

The following partners have helped make this donation possible, despite many challenges and for many years:

  • Yayoi Kondo, Mayor of Adachi City Tokyo, Japan
  • Takako Asaka, President, Sakura Association
  • Taro Enomoto, former City Manager of Adachi Living Things
  • Kenji Usukura, Adachi City, Cherry Blossom Specialist
  • Tokiko Ando Freeman, Toyota Motors North America
  • Andrea Schepmann, former Managing Director, Krohn Conservatory
  • Gerald Checco, former park board superintendent
  • Jan Brown Checco, Artistic Director, Butterflies of Japan
  • Bob Taft, former Governor of Ohio
  • Carla Romannelli, former Executive Director, JASGC